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Data Where?

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Introduction by Lilian Edwards

Below is a blog written originally on the personal website of Prof Derek McAuley, head of the Horizon Digital Economy Hub and Doctoral Training Centre and lead for Nottingham as partner in CREATe. I have added a short new introduction to put into context why the work outlined below is an integral and vital part of the CREATe work programme.
Horizon is CREATe’s major partner looking at the creative industries’ problems from the viewpoint of technology and computing science. Specifically, Horizon took on the Herculean job of considering a number of interlocked problems. First, the Internet is obviously the source of, and platform for, much of the new creative and innovative activity in modern society. It clearly and brutally cannot be ignored by a Centre devoted to promoting the creative industries.

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R&D in Creative Industries: Some Lessons from the Book Publishing sector!

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Acrobats Unemployed by Giulia Frances (http://giuliafrances.blogspot.co.uk/)

Acrobats Unemployed by Giulia Frances (http://giuliafrances.blogspot.co.uk/)

In a timely post in the Managing Culture section of the Tafter Journal, Pierre-Jean Benghozi and Elisa Salvador from Ecole Polytechnique Paris, argue that despite an increase in interest in the strategic and economic dimensions of creative industries (CIs) and their business models, the issue of managing R&D in the creative industries is severely neglected, with most organizations providing for poor investments in the R&D function. They cite innovations such as, the sound recording by Edison/ General Electric in the early 20th Century, the Walkman by Sony, and, the Appstore by Apple, where disruptive innovations strategically changing the landscape of a creative industry have come from outside the industry, and where creative firms have not managed to control their innovation. This has been attributed to poor investment in the R&D function within CIs.

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Copyright and Musicians at the Digital Margins

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Ghost Beach/www.artistsvsartists.com

Credit: Ghost Beach / www.artistsvsartists.com

What do musicians think of copyright? Do their views depend on whether they play jazz or rock? Or whether the issue is downloading or sampling? Are their views simply a product of commercial self-interest, or do politics and aesthetics mediate them?

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“Polemic: how readers will discover books in future” by Charlie Stross

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stross

In the future, readers will not go in search of books to read. Feral books will stalk readers, sneak into their ebook libraries, and leap out to ambush them. Readers will have to beat books off with a baseball bat; hold them at bay with a flaming torch: refuse to interact: and in extreme cases, feign dyslexia, blindness or locked-in syndrome to avoid being subjected to literature.

You think I’m exaggerating for effect, don’t you?

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Extracts from Panel Discussion “Copyright, and the Regulation of Orphan Works” held on 02/07/2013

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Orphans-event-arnold_with_screenToday, we publish a summary, transcript and resource page which captures the panel discussion on regulation of orphan works held at the Law Society (London) on 2nd July 2013. The panel discussion followed the launch of an empirical report, titled “Copyright, and the Regulation of Orphan Works” published for the UK IPO by academics from Bournemouth University and CREATe, RCUK Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy. The event, organized jointly by the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) and CREATe, generated considerable debate. We are now providing a summary of the day’s proceedings for further comment and analysis.

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What price “expropriation”?

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A new empirical study of so-called Orphan Works, commissioned by the UK Intellectual Property Office, and undertaken by academics from Bournemouth University, and the CREATe Centre at the University of Glasgow, comes to surprising results. It offers a clearer understanding of how orphan works are regulated and priced in other jurisdictions, and how a pricing system could be structured to ensure that “parents” are fairly remunerated if they re-appear, and users are incentivised to access and exploit registered orphan works.

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Copyright Control

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In his column published in The Bookseller on 15th February, Richard Mollet, chief executive of the Publishers Association, takes aim at CREATe, a new academic research centre investigating “copyright and new business models in the creative economy”.
According to Mollet, at least three things are wrong with CREATe: (1) The academics involved in CREATe are prejudiced in favour of copyright reform; (2) CREATe’s research programme ignores successful British companies; (3) More generally, academic research is unlikely to be helpful for creative businesses because academics lack direct experience of working in the sector. I will address these points in turn.

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CREATe: Creativity, Regulation, Enterprise and Technology

By About CREATe, Blog

CREATe is the Centre for Copyright and New Business Models in the Creative Economy, a national research hub jointly funded by the AHRC (Arts & Humanities), EPSRC (Engineering & Physical Sciences) and ESRC (Economic & Social Sciences). CREATe is a pioneering interdisciplinary initiative, and globally the first effort to investigate the relationship between Creativity, Regulation, Enterprise and Technology (=CREATe) through the lens of copyright law.

The UK has probably the largest creative sector in the world relative to GDP, accounting for over 6% of the overall economy and contributing around £60bn per annum. CREATe will examine the business, regulatory and cultural infrastructure of the cultural and creative industries by exploring cutting-edge questions around digitisation, copyright, and innovation in the arts and technology. CREATe is based at the University of Glasgow, leading a consortium of 7 Universities: the University of East Anglia, the  University of Edinburgh, Goldsmiths (University of London), the University of Nottingham, the University of St. Andrews and the University of Strathclyde.

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