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Project: Digital Technologies & Humanism

Artificial Creativity: Exploring Artificial Intelligence and Creativity through the Philosophy of Technology

Posted on    by CREATe Team
Project: Digital Technologies & Humanism

Artificial Creativity: Exploring Artificial Intelligence and Creativity through the Philosophy of Technology

By 8 June 2024July 8th, 2024No Comments

Artificial Creativity: Exploring Artificial Intelligence and Creativity through the Philosophy of Technology

Project Overview

Artificial Intelligence has massive implications not only for the creative industries, but to the very concept of creativity itself. The current state-of-the-art is to develop generative AI systems that try and emulate what the human mind is doing in the creative process, based on both a cognitive science understanding of creativity and a politics of the creative economy, which puts value on the outputs of the creative process, but which is often blind to many other contingent, human and non-human processes. By doing this, the deployment of AI to carry out so-called ‘creative’ tasks introduces a certain rationality of creativity, which requires careful unpacking and critical evaluation.

In this ongoing project I explore how AI systems may be seen to both ‘disrupt’ certain concepts of creativity, whilst also reinforcing others, and the implications of this, not only for the creative industries, but conceptions of humanism in general. I take a philosophy of technology approach to these questions, inspired by the earlier work of André Leroi-Gourhan and Ernst Kapp, trying to unpack the way emerging technologies both introduce new systems of reason and rationality into life in the technical milieu and also how technologies of ‘artificial creativity’, as projections of what we think of as human faculties, impact on the understanding of humanism in the 21st Century. The outputs of this project have implications for philosophers, policy and regulation stakeholders, developers of AI as well as creative practitioners.

illustration with the text:"the computer reads these instructions and constructs a complete explicit description of each frame of the movie accordingly"
Kenneth C. Knowlton, A Computer Technique for the Production of Animated Movies (still), 1963

Related Events and Outputs:

Timothy Barker (forthcoming, 2024) – “Artificial Creativity: A Process Philosophy of Technology Perspective” for the Journal of Continental Philosophy 5.1 Special Issue on Technology.

Tim was invited to participate at the Roundtable on AI and Creativity at the Centre for International Intellectual Property Studies, University of Strasbourg, 28 July 2024.